College of Natural & Agricultural Sciences

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                                                       ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN MOSQUITO Biology RECRUITMENT               Junior Entomologist Summer Camp 2022

Taking the scenic route

Riding a bicycle to work comes naturally to Boris Baer and his wife Barbara Baer-Imhoof, both researchers at UC Riverside’s Center for Integrative Bee Research, or CIBER. The couple are originally from Switzerland where they never owned a car. Later, when they moved to Copenhagen, Denmark, and then Perth, Australia, they commuted regularly by bike...
By Imran Ghori |

Entomology MS+BS program graduate Darin McGuire publishes first paper

Darin McGuire, one of the first students to graduate from the Entomology department's BS+MS program, has published his first paper. The paper is titled: A novel distribution of supergene genotypes is present in the socially polymorphic ant Formica neoclara. The Department of Entomology has a new degree program that allows students to obtain both a...

Killing cockroaches with pesticides is only making the species stronger

At around age 10, I spotted a cockroach on the kitchen counter and grabbed the closest thing near me: a coffee pot, which I brought down on the head of the bug and then found myself standing there, holding nothing but the glass handle. “I’m sorry, Mom,” I said about the broken flask. “But at...
By Troy Farah |

Who's Eating Who?

You never forget the moment when your path in life becomes clear. For Erin Wilson-Rankin, that moment came in an undergraduate classroom at Georgetown University when she learned about a caterpillar that evades predators by flinging its poop. “It was actually my professor, Martha Weiss, talking about her own research into the silver-spotted skipper butterfly...
By Jules Bernstein |

California Study Warns of Growing Insecticide Resistance in Cockroaches

The German cockroach (Blattella germanica) is a common pest in buildings throughout the world. It spreads pathogens that can cause diarrheal disease and allergens that can cause lung hypersensitivity in vulnerable people. Insecticide sprays and insecticide-loaded baits have been used to control B. germanica for decades, but there is evidence that some populations have developed...
By John P. Roche, Ph.D. |

How to Become a Vulture and Not Die Trying:

Meat-eating bees made the news in late 2021, after a study examined the unique gut microbiomes of these unusual species. Trigona hypogea, Trigona necrophaga, and Trigona crassipes are the only three known bee species in the world that feed exclusively on carrion. Here on Earth, multicellular life has its origins in single-celled bacteria. It took...
By Magda P. Argueta Guzmán |

UCR entomologist wins Japan’s biggest prize for young researchers

The Japan Academy Medal, widely considered the most prestigious award for young Japanese researchers, only goes to six recipients annually. This year associate entomology professor Naoki Yamanaka has been elected for the honor. Chosen among nominees from all fields of sciences and humanities, Yamanaka was recognized for research into the way that steroid hormones control...
By Jules Bernstein |

Are daddy longlegs really the most venomous spiders in the world?

You've probably heard this playground legend: Daddy longlegs are the most venomous spiders in the world, but their fangs are too short to bite you. Is this really true? The short answer: no. But to reach that answer, we're going to have to get a few things straight. "First, what are you calling a daddy...
By Ashley Hamer |

Queen’s genes determine sex of entire ant colonies

Researchers have discovered the genetic basis for a quirk of the animal kingdom — how ant queens produce broods that are entirely male or female. “It’s weird to have any parent that’s only producing one sex or the other,” said UC Riverside entomologist and study author Jessica Purcell. Scientists have known for some time that...
By Jules Bernstein |

Rising temperatures overcook bumblebees' brunch

Bumblebees pollinate many of our favorite foods, but their own diet is being upset by climate change, according to a new University of California, Riverside study.  There’s a sweet spot where the floral nectar bees eat has just the right balance of microbes like bacteria and yeast in it. Hotter weather can upset that balance...
By NSF Public Affairs |

UCR Entomology Program is awarded GAANN to support PhD students

The Entomology Program was awarded a GAANN (Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need) grant by the Department of Education. Funding from this award will be used to recruit and provide fellowships to 6-8 UCR Entomology PhD students per year. PhD applicants for Fall 2022 are strongly encouraged to indicate their interest in being considered...

Rising temperatures overcook bumblebees’ brunch

Bumblebees pollinate many of our favorite foods, but their own diet is being upset by climate change, according to a new UC Riverside study. Bombus impatiens, aka the common eastern bumblebee, served as taste tester for this experiment. There’s a sweet spot where floral nectar that bees eat has just the right balance of microbes...
By Jules Bernstein |

Dr. Erin Wilson Rankin Discusses Recent Research On Hummingbirds with NPR

On NPR Inland Edition podcase Dr. Erin Wilson Rankin Discusses Recent Research On Hummingbirds

Even California Has a Mosquito Problem

When I moved to Los Angeles years ago, I was told by native Angeleno friends that the city without humidity also definitely did not have mosquitoes. What is that whizzing sound then? The welts on my ankles? My favorite cafe has taken to selling bottles of insect repellent next to the cash register. Were my...
By Marie Tae McDermott |

Hummingbirds can smell their way out of danger

In less time than it takes to read this sentence, hummingbirds can catch a whiff of potential trouble. That’s the result of new UC Riverside research showing, contrary to popular belief, the tiny birds do have an active sense of smell. Researchers have known for some time that vultures have a highly sensitive sense of...
By Jules Bernstein |

Collaborating to Solve Problems, Connecting to Serve Communities

UC Riverside Professor of Entomology Thomas Perring actively engages the UCCE network in his research and teaching. One example is his work with Area Viticulture/Pest Management Advisor Carmen Gispert to evaluate Pierce’s disease (PD) and sharpshooter vectors in Coachella Valley vineyards. He also exposes undergraduate and graduate students to the work that farm advisors do...
By Isgouhi Kaloshian |

Hollis Woodard wins National Science Foundation CAREER Award

Bumblebee queens start off as solitary insects, looking for a place to nest. After finding a spot, the queen lays eggs and collects food to feed the brood. This continues until the first group of workers hatch and take over the queen’s food gathering and feeding duties. Woodard’s group will do experiments to find out...
By Holly Ober |

What you need to start planting and stop spraying to keep bees healthy and happy

If you care about bees... well, let’s be real: If you care about eating (since bees pollinate the plants that produce our food) two new studies underscore two simple things we home gardeners in and around Los Angeles can do to help those busy buzzers live longer, healthier lives: 1. Lace your yard or balcony...
By Jeanette Marantos |

Study shows common insecticide is harmful in any amount

Anew UC Riverside study shows that a type of insecticide made for commercial plant nurseries is harmful to a typical bee even when applied well below the label rate. The study has now been published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. Chemically similar to nicotine, neonicotinoids are insecticides that protect...
By Jules Bernstein |
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