Maggots and murder: what insects can teach us about crime
By Jules Bernstein on
Taking care to stand upwind, UC Riverside students display stoic professionalism as they collect insects off a pig carcass in 90-degree heat. This scene from a class in forensic entomology could have been ripped from any TV police drama and in some ways, it was. Professor Alec Gerry said intense student interest in crime scene…
UCR Entomologist Honored
By Iqbal Pittalwala on
Three UC Riverside entomologists have won prestigious awards from the Pacific Branch, Entomological Society of America.   Elizabeth Grafton-Cardwell, director of the Lindcove Research and Extension Center at Exeter, Calif. and a research entomologist, won the CW Woodworth Award “for outstanding accomplishments in entomology over…
Bee mite arrival in Hawaii causes pathogen changes in honeybee predators
By Iqbal Pittalwala on
The reddish-brown varroa mite, a parasite of honeybees and accidentally introduced in the Big Island of Hawaii in 2007-08, is about the size of a pinhead. Yet, its effects there are concerning to entomologists because the mite is found nearly everywhere honeybees are present. A team led by entomologists at the University of…
Researchers identify new approach for controlling dengue fever and Zika virus
By Iqbal Pittalwala on
Mosquitoes are the world’s deadliest animals, killing thousands of people and causing millions of illnesses each year. To be able to reproduce and become effective disease carriers, mosquitoes must first attain optimal body size and nutritional status.  A pair of researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have…
ESA Recognizes Professor for Interactive Approach to Teaching
By Sarah Nightingale on
William Walton, a professor of eantomology, has received the Distinguished Achievement Award in Teaching from the Entomological Society of America (ESA). The award is presented annually to the member of the Society deemed to be the most outstanding teacher of the year. Walton, who has been on the UCR faculty since 1995, teaches…
Researchers to Target Mosquito Egg Production to Curtail Disease
By Igbal Pittalwala on
By: Igbal Pittalwala on July 13, 2018 RIVERSIDE, Calif. — Entomologists at the University of California, Riverside have received a five-year grant of $2.44 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, or NIAID, to investigate the role hormones play in the female mosquito’s ability to use human blood for…
UCR Scientist Rediscovers Insect Lost For 105 Years
By Sarah Nightingale on
RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) — A scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has rediscovered a tiny flower beetle that was last seen more than a century ago. Adriean Mayor, a research associate in entomology, rediscovered the species in April during ongoing field research in California. Mayor said the beetle, …
UCR Researchers Receive Grant to Improve Pollinator Health
By Sarah Nightingale on
RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) — A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have received a $490,000 Pollinator Health Fund grant from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR). The grant will support a study measuring the effectiveness of recommended almond orchard management practices in…
Invasive Weevil: Tiny insect poses huge threat to San Diego Palm Trees
By Abbie Alford, Reporter on
SAN DIEGO (NEWS 8) – A tiny insect is posing a huge ecological and economic threat to San Diego County. The South American Palm Weevils have made their way north from Mexico and are having a destructive impact on palm trees in the San Diego region – a multi-million dollar industry in Southern California’s landscape. Mark Hoddle Ph…
Researchers Receive $1M for Project Challenging Long-Standing Paradigm in Endocrinology
By Igbal Pittalwala on
RIVERSIDE, Calif. – A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside, seeking to upend a long-held theory explaining how hormones freely enter and exit cells, has received a major boost in the form of a $1 million award from the W. M. Keck Foundation. Steroid hormones — chemical messengers derived from cholesterol…
For Global Invasion, Argentine Ants Use Chemical Weapons
By Sarah Nightingale on
RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) — From their native home on the banks of South America’s Paraná River, Argentine ants have conquered six continents and many oceanic islands. Their success is explained by several factors: they have more than one queen per colony, making them difficult to eradicate, and they adapt to changes in…
Beware the "Dark Side" of Light Traps
By Edward Ricciuti on
The Old Reliable for generations of entomologists, the light trap remains perhaps the best catchall collecting device to sample large numbers and species of insects, but it also may mask infestations of some insect-borne illnesses and even expose humans to disease vectors. So suggests a paper published today in the Journal of…
California Academy of Sciences Welcomes New Fellows, Bestows Annual Awards
By Haley Bowling, Katie Jewett on
SAN FRANCISCO (October 6, 2017) — The California Academy of Sciences is pleased to announce that 16 new members have joined the ranks of the Academy Fellows, a governing group of more than 400 distinguished scientists who have made notable contributions to one or more of the natural sciences. Nominated by their colleagues and…
UCR, UC Davis Center to Fight Vector-Borne Diseases
By J.D. Warren on
This week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention has announced a bold step to enhance public-health preparedness for diseases transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks in the nation’s Southwest. With an $8 million grant from the CDC, UC Riverside and UC Davis researchers will launch the Pacific Southwest Regional…
Decoding Chemical Communications to Control Insects
Build a better mouse trap, they say, and the world will beat a path to your door. But build a Lygus bug trap, and not only will farmers beat that path to your door, they’ll pave it, light it and landscape it for you, too. Lygus are that serious of a problem in dozens of crops, and they’re hard to control. “What I’d love to see is…
Don't look now, but a host of world-class entomologists are in your back yard
By Nicole Miller-Coleman on
According to the Center for World University Rankings, an organization that measures the world’s top degree-granting institutions of higher education in 227 subject categories, the UCR entomology department now ranks No. 2 in the world. Richard Redak, Ph.D., professor and chair of the UCR Department of Entomology, points out that…
UC Riverside-led Team Wins $14.9 Million DARPA Grant to Battle Disease-carrying Mosquitoes
  Riverside, Ca. – A University of California, Riverside scientist is leading a team of researchers that will receive up to $14.9 million dollars from The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to be part of the “Safe Genes” program to study innovative genetic techniques to control disease-causing mosquitoes. With the…
Red Palm Weevils Wreak Havoc On Palm Plantations Across the Globe
By Maanvi Singh on
One of the biggest threats to global agriculture these days is a tiny, bright red weevil. These little crimson devils eviscerate coconut, date and oil palms, and are native to South Asia. But thanks to globalization, and the fact that these tenacious buggers can fly up to 30 miles a day — over the last three decades they've spread…
A Real Alien Invasion Is Coming to a Palm Tree Near You
By Elliot Kennerson on
Summer means vacation time, and nothing says, “Welcome to paradise!” quite like a palm tree. From Waikiki to Mar-a-Lago, the trees' iconic fronds instantly signal luxury, glamor and the good life. Though it’s home to only one native species, California has nonetheless adopted the palm as one of its quintessential icons. Just turn…
Entomologist Named a Pew Scholar
By Iqbal Pittalwala on
RIVERSIDE, Calif. – Naoki Yamanaka, an assistant professor of entomology at the University of California, Riverside, has been named a Pew scholar in the biomedical sciences. Along with 21 other exceptional early-career researchers named as Pew scholars by The Pew Charitable Trusts, he will receive four years of flexible funding to…
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